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Lewis Sheiner


2019
Stockholm, Sweden



2018
Montreux, Switzerland

2017
Budapest, Hungary

2016
Lisboa, Portugal

2015
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2014
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2013
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2009
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2007
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2006
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2004
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2003
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2002
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2000
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1999
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1998
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1997
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1994
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1993
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1992
Basel, Switzerland



Printable version

PAGE. Abstracts of the Annual Meeting of the Population Approach Group in Europe.
ISSN 1871-6032

Reference:
PAGE 26 (2017) Abstr 7339 [www.page-meeting.org/?abstract=7339]


PDF poster/presentation:
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Poster: Drug/Disease modelling - Oncology


III-57 Yuri Kosinsky Radiation and anti-PD-L1 treatment combinations: Immune cell responses and dose scheduling optimization using a joint experimental and systems modeling approach

Yuri Kosinsky (1), Simon Dovedi (2), Kirill Peskov (1), Veronika Voronova (1), Lulu Chu (3a), Eric Masson (3a), Helen Tomkinson (3b), Nidal Al-Huniti (3a), Don Stanski (3c), Gabriel Helmlinger (3a)

1 M&S Decisions, Moscow, Russia; 2 MedImmune, Cambridge, UK; 3 Early Clinical Development, IMED Biotech Unit, AstraZeneca; 3a Waltham, MA, USA; 3b Cambridge, UK;3c Gaithersburg, MD, USA

Objectives: Investigations into the interactions between radiotherapy(RT) and the host immune system have uncovered new mechanisms that can potentially be exploited to improve the efficacy of RT [1]. RT not only exerts direct cytotoxic effects on tumor cells, but may also modulate the tumor microenvironment to facilitate a significant anti-tumor immune response. Combination therapies of radiation and mAb blockade of the immuno-suppressive programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) have indeed shown synergy in a number of preclinical studies [2, 3].

Methods: Based on data from [2], we developed and independently validated a semi-mechanistic population model of anti-tumor T cell immune response development linked to CT26 tumor size dynamics in mice, under control, mono- and combination settings of RT and anti-PD-L1 treatments. Variability in individual tumor size dynamics was taken into account using a mixed effects model at the level of tumor infiltrating T effector cell influx. 

Results: Upon validation, the proposed model was used successfully to reproduce anti-tumor efficacy in a broad range of therapeutically-realistic RT and anti-PD-L1 mono- and combination dosing schedules. Also the model is able to reproduce the tumor size dynamics under CD8+ cell depletion conditions, highlighting a pivotal role of T effector cells in RT-induced tumor growth inhibition.

Using such a validated QSP model, we gained a detailed quantitative understanding of the synergistic effects underlying immune cell interactions as linked to tumor size modulation, under RT and anti-PD-L1 treatments. We further show the potential in using this model as an in-silico evaluation tool to explore, prospectively, different combination dosing regimens and sequencing, in order to achieve optimal anti-tumor responses. Particularly, a single-dose RT 10 Gy scenario with concurrent anti-PD-L1 (0.2 mg 3qw) was found to be optimal for CT26 tumor bearing mice. 

Conclusions: This modeling study provided quantitative mechanistic explanations of the links between RT and anti-tumor immune responses, and described how appropriate combinations and schedules of immuno-modulation and radiation may tip the immune balance in favor of host, robustly enough to lead to tumor shrinkage or rejection.



References:
[1] R. R.Weichselbaum et al. “Radiotherapy and immunotherapy: a beneficial liaison?” (2017) Nature Rev Clin Oncol. doi:10.1038/nrclinonc.2016.211
[2]  S. J. Dovedi et al. “Acquired resistance to fractionated radiotherapy can be overcome by concurrent PD-L1 blockade”. (2014) Cancer Res 74: 5458-5468.
[3]  L. Deng et al. “Irradiation and anti–PD-L1 treatment synergistically promote antitumor immunity in mice”. (2014) J Clin Invest. 124:687–695.